The “Enal” part of the name Bar Enal actually means 'Ente Nazionali Assistenza (ai) Lavoratori', which literally translated means 'National Entity for Assistance to the Labourer' and was, in times past, a local council subsidised club with council employees running it on a non-profit making basis where the 'labourer' (working man), could get a cheap glass of wine/beer/coffee when he'd finished work, sit and read the paper, play cards with friends, argue (typical Italian pastime) and generally relax. There are still proper ENAL’s in existence in Italy but they are few and far between these days and are from a bygone era. We rent the premises from a 'Direttivo di Consiglio' (conciliatory committee), as tenants. The actual building is part of the Palazzo Dei Capitani complex - dating from the sixteenth century - which belongs to...

the local Comune/Council, and the principle of being a 'working men's/social club' still stands. We actually have quite a large membership of local town folk who come in and play cards during the winter months whilst their hotels bars shops and restaurants are closed, and often enough the pensioners will turn up to play cards in the summer afternoons too- just to rub salt into the wounds, seeing as they seldom drink anything, yet we pay the bills. They all seem to have extremely short arms and very deep pockets. The membership fee goes to the 'committee' just like in English working men’s clubs and is used for general maintenance of the place wherever needed. We were actually members of the club for quite a few years before we took over the tenancy in Jan...

2001. We're open to non-members of course; otherwise we'd see very few people in the summer as most of our local members are business owners and are otherwise occupied. We've been here for 15 years now and are not yet showing signs of weakening, we’re hoping to make it for a few more yet. Please bear in mind that we're a bunch of old fogeys and that guests are expected to behave in an appropriate manner, i.e. as if being guests in a private, or working men's club in the UK. Rowdy groups of party revelers, stag or hen night groups, sorry, not here please. The members of the social club come here to escape their families, children and/or grandchildren and do not appreciate loads of noise, or little ones running around, so children under...

5 years cannot be admitted, sorry it's not our ruling, that's just how it is. However, having appeared to be miserable sods, we’re really not all that bad, if you don’t mind being treated a bit like guests at Fawlty towers that is…

Rod plays at Bar Enal most summers, next gig will probably be August 2016

Rod was at school with John Lennon-although not in the same year, but he first met him when he was six years old because they went to the same Sunday school. When Rod bought a banjo, the skiffle scene was just beginning in England and the moment he mentioned it to a friend, regardless of the fact that he couldn't play it; he was invited to join a skiffle band called "The Blackjacks". It featured various chaps on all sorts of instruments, including a guy called John Lennon on guitar. The band was just for fun, and the name was soon changed to The Quarrymen, as they'd all been to Quarry Bank school. Rod was there when John Lennon first met Paul McCartney, but left the band before Paul joined, in order to go to university. Paul...

being the most determined of the band soon invited George Harrison to join and then they began to go places. Rod doesn't seem to regret not becoming a Beatle and says he's had fun in his life just the same-although the money would have been nice. On the 25th anniversary of John Lennon's death, all the members of the original band-before Paul joined-5 in all, were invited to re-form for a tribute concert, and things took off. They formed an electric band and have been touring ever since, USA, Japan, Russia, and have recently played in Berlin. Now there're just three of them, Rod Davis on guitar and vocals, Colin Hanton on drums and Len Garry on Guitar. They'll often invite members of the audience who "know how" to accompany them on washboard or Tea Chest bass. He...

plays mostly his own material, and some country and Bluegrass stuff, and the odd skiffle tune-Lonnie Donegan etc, for which I accompany him on the Washboard - and tells the story of the development of the British Rock n Roll scene. He's a very fascinating man and a great entertainer. Please click on the links below for more information.